Tips for Growing Winter Squash

Tips for Growing Winter Squash

What is the difference between Summer and Winter Squash? Mostly the growing time. Both types of squash are planted in early summer; the winter squash takes longer to mature and become fully ripe, about 80-120 days. Winter squash are also tough-skinned. * Disclaimer: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. You don’t have to purchase them through my links, but if you do, you will help support StraightWay, Inc. (www.straightway.org), a non-profit rehabilitation program that works with whole families as well as single moms and dads, and single guys and gals. For more information, visit my Disclosure[…]

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Growing Tips for Summer Squash

Growing Tips for Summer Squash

When people think of summer squash, they usually think of Zucchini. But there is more to summer squash than Zucchini. Other types of summer squash are: Yellow Squash: yellow, long, some with curved necks Zucchini Squash: Club-shaped, green fruits Pattypan Squash: Small, shaped like small flying saucers with scalloped edges. Colors from green to yellow to white Round Squash: Single-serving sized fruits on compact bushes Tromboncino Squash: Large curved light-green fruit, grows best on a trellis * Disclaimer: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. You don’t have to purchase them through my links, but if you[…]

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April Gardening Tasks

April Gardening Tasks

April is the first month when the garden is actively growing. The cool-season crops should be in the ground and the warm-season crops are almost ready to plant. Everything from here on can be direct-seeded into the ground. * Disclaimer: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. You don’t have to purchase them through my links, but if you do, you will help support StraightWay, Inc. (www.straightway.org), a non-profit rehabilitation program that works with whole families as well as single moms and dads, and single guys and gals. For more information, visit my Disclosure page. You can[…]

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State of the April Garden

State of the April Garden

Just a little tour to show you what’s happening in my garden in April. I have my garden divided up into several plots for herbs and vegetables. You can see a plot plan here. * Disclaimer: Some of the links in this post are affiliate links. You don’t have to purchase them through my links, but if you do, you will help support StraightWay, Inc. (www.straightway.org), a non-profit rehabilitation program that works with whole families as well as single moms and dads, and single guys and gals. For more information, visit my Disclosure page. My herb plots are a mixed[…]

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The Zone 9 April Planting Guide

April is here!  Time to get the garden in full swing! If you are unsure of what to plant and when, you can use this handy infographic to remind you. Since gardening in Texas Zone 9 can be done year-round, you will need a monthly guide detailing what plants are ready to plant each month. You can plant hot-season crops in the summer, cool-season crops in the fall, and overwintering crops as the frost approaches. No longer does your garden need to be a plant-once-and harvest happening–you can plant and harvest year-round with these helpful guides. To get these guides[…]

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Your Quick Guide to Growing Watermelons

Your Quick Guide to Growing Watermelons

  Growing Watermelons is another great summer crop in Texas! Watermelons can be grown in large or small spaces, in long growing seasons or short. The ones that take a larger space are sprawling varieties, such as Sugar Baby or Yellow Doll. The melons with smaller space requirements are bush varieties, such as Garden Baby Hybrid or Bush Jubilee. These I’ve mentioned produce fruit in 65-70 days. Examples of the long-season varieties are Cobb Gem, Rattlesnake or Charleston. These melons are larger, and take longer to mature, about 85-100 days. Melons do well in Texas Zone 9, with its high[…]

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